This brief article is not about politics, cops, crime, drugs or sex. It’s about a great man who brought the lighter side of life into our hearts, who was equally as funny as he was musically brilliant. We old folks will remember him well. It’s too bad such a dear-hearted soul is not still around, to bring joy, love and laughter into our lives. Examples:  Who said…       Laughter is the shortest distance
I served as a cop for thirty years in Miami. The greatest honor was to share the camaraderie and friendship with the finest, most caring and bravest human beings on planet earth. There are about 800,000 police officers in the United States. Their services are called for nearly 183 million times a year. Not much down time, indeed. When applying for the job, most police officers I’ve known not only seek pay and benefits, they
On July 26th, 1960, Dwight D. Eisenhower was in his waning months as president; Brenda Lee’s “I’m Sorry” topped the music charts; baseball Yankee, Mickey Mantle would become the home run champ while most of the south still practiced strict segregation based on race.      Meanwhile, Dade County was hiring an unlikely new rookie cop.      Downtown Miami was dark and quiet at 10:50 p.m. Thick with fog, the summer night air was like breathing
It is rare that I will praise a new book release. But The Year of Dangerous Days is truly a great read, particularly for those who have followed the course of law enforcement and struggles with civil disobedience and crime in Miami in 1979 and 1981.      Nicholas Griffin, a first-class writer, has authored four fiction novels, and three books of non-fiction. His new book, published by Simon and Schuster, has just been released. I
(This Op-Ed appears this date in the Florida Today newspaper.   When researching sources for an article about the impact of coronavirus on mental health problems in America, I didn’t realize the enormity of this issue.      Naturally, concerns would affect millions of Americans, but the stark figures about the suicide problem, via addiction, poverty, joblessness and depression, are far more serious than anticipated. A 650-word essay can barely touch on a subject which is