MICHELLE LIKELY TO RUN AS VP RUNNING MATE

As the Democratic VP prize is nearing the next election, there is a lot of speculation about which woman Biden will select.  (After all, he did promise to appoint a woman)
I’ve been writing about this for three years. Most folks think I’m nuts, after all, she has no in-office experience.  Holding office doesn’t matter, it’s winning that matters…even if it’s Daisy Mae or AOC.
Rush Limbaugh took to his radio show today and predicted that Michelle Obama will be Biden’s running mate, and how that would assure Obama of another 8 years, defacto, in the Oval Office again. I felt like calling Rush and ask if he gleaned that from me.
Then I recalled writing my own predictions 2 and 3 years ago.  Here are the articles:
(Note: Item #2)
PREDICTIONS 2017 | Marshall Frank
Also, in 2018, I had predicted that Michelle Obama will be the likely VP running mate, or presidential nominee, regardless who led the field. Check it out:
MICHELLE OBAMA STRONGEST 2020 DEM. CANDIDATE – Op-Ed | Marshall Frank
And now, with the left-media behind her, the predictions are beginning to manifest.
It’s all about power.
Rush Limbaugh suggested that Biden might get elected with Michelle as #2, then resign after taking office. Anything is possible.
Your thoughts welcome.
 
MF
 

VAUDEVILLE'S LAST MAN STANDING

VAUDEVILLE’S LAST MAN STANDING
 
 By Marshall Frank                                                                            
This is not about a pandemic virus, or the economy, world war or the rate of crime. No sex, no violence, no destitution. It’s about a little man named Arthur who died in 1941 in a mental institution across the Hudson River from Sing Sing prison. No one was there, but the hospital attendants. No family, no friends.
     So who would care? Who would bother to read this story when, in the year 2020, this fellow would not be known to anyone on planet Earth other than a handful of distant relatives. Why would any writer take the time?
     Stay tuned.
     Arthur was born in 1899 in New York City, one of nine kids whose Jewish parents had set foot in Ellis Island as immigrants from Eastern Europe in 1886. William McKinley was president while the Spanish-American War raged on and the United States welcomed Guam, Samoa and Puerto Rico as new possessions of the United States.
     So what was it about Arthur that set him apart?
     Arthur’s four brothers all grew up to become professional businessmen. His sisters were mostly single women relying, in part, on the brothers for support. While encouraged to get an education, he chose to follow his natural talents to become a professional cartoonist. That eventually introduced him to Vaudeville and all the glitz and stardom that came with it. Arthur was fascinated with live on-stage show business, where he commiserated with singers, dancers, jugglers, musicians, and more, bringing audiences to their feet.
     Arthur met many show-biz stars around the theater circuit who taught to him to dance. He worked up a series of comedy routines while applying make-up to appear as an old man, from the confederacy. His comic dance steps glided hysterically around the stage, only to be dubbed as a “moonwalk” 60 years later by Michael Jackson.
     He always had beautiful dancing girls as straight-women for his jokes. By 1928, Arthur was a huge star, working the same stage at the Palace Theater in Manhattan with the likes of Milton Berle, Ginger Rogers and Rudy Vallee.
     Arthur eventually met his dream woman, Vivien, after she landed a dancing/singing audition at age 19. He was hooked. Then they were married. A redheaded bombshell who could sing plus dance and play classical piano, Vivien easily mingled with the stars of Broadway.
     They were a perfect team. They traveled the Orpheum Circuit around the nation by train, bringing all audiences to howl in laughter in San Francisco, Chicago, Dallas, and more. They also enjoyed bookings at the Palladium in London and other theaters in Paris. This was during the infamous Prohibition Era that sparked the moniker of the times: The Roarin’ Twenties.
     Meanwhile, the depression waged on while Arthur and Vivien earned enough money to not only support themselves, but Arthur’s unmarried sisters as well. Then came a baby boy named Bennett. Vivien had to begin adjusting to a new life staying at home. But, the income was gone.
     By the late 1930’s, Vaudeville bookings diminished drastically as talkie movies and radio emerged as the preferred sources of entertainment. Agents no longer found Vaudeville welcoming. Bookings vanished. Arthur was devastated. He refused any other opportunities in radio and movies. He desperately wanted to continue the embrace of live audiences and the infectious laughter that was so addicting.  Not to be.
     Arthur paced the floors night after night, babbling, singing, writing, calling agents during late hours, smoking four packs a day and writing jokes upon jokes all night long. Now pregnant with another child, Vivien was unable to keep her sanity nor make a living to support two children. Arguments ensued. Vivien went into a state of depression. Doctors determined that Arthur was severely manic depressive and schizophrenic. He was placed in a New York mental hospital called Creedmore.
     The story is sad, indeed. Two years later, at another psychiatric hospital, Arthur was given insulin shock treatment which inadvertently destroyed his immune system. Arthur died from pneumonia in November, 1941.
     The 42 year-old comic never laid eyes on his second son. But as long that second son is still living, Arthur Robert Frank will always matter.
    By the way, today is April 9th. Happy Birthday, Dad. 
 
                                                                       
 
 
 

A FRANK MOVIE REVIEW: "EMMA" – 5/10

Movie:         “Emma”
Rating:         5 out of 10.
In a word:   Boring
 
     Be prepared for one more adaptation of the 1815 Jane Austen novel, first filmed in 1996 starring Gwyneth Paltrow. This movie, starring Anya Taylor-Joy follows the same basic characters within like-settings, mainly the breathtaking countryside of inner England dotted with landscapes and mansions much like any other period-based film about old England, to include a smattering of snobbery.
     If you like that genre, though unoriginal, you’ll like this movie. For sure, the photography is inspiring and the costumes awesome. The cast of actors played their roles well, including Miss Taylor-Joy’s lead.
     If there is criticism earned, it must be attributed to the director, Autumn De Wilde who gave us one scene after another of Emma’s gazing eyes and close-up expressions ad nauseam, slowing the film to a point of sheer boredom.
     The plot is simple: Emma Woodhouse is a young, beautiful, and vain woman who lives in a large mansion on the Hartford estate of her elderly father in the village of Highbury. She has no wish to marry, but enjoys pairing her family and friends. The film mostly follows Emma and her friend Harriet as they experience friendships, love and heartbreaks, complete with an array of misunderstandings because no one ever comes to the point in a conversation.
     One interesting item of trivia: When the gentleman, Mr. Knightly, asked Emma for her hand in marriage, the close-up shows the actress suffering from a nosebleed, that was apparently unscripted. But they left it in the movie anyway.
     Lovers of old-English aristocracy will like this film. Otherwise, be prepared to yawn.
     I give it a 5 out of 10.
Emma. (2020) – Trivia – IMDb
 
 
 
 
 

My Interview 2015.

 
Five years ago, I was recruited by a local videographer to participate in one of her programs where she delved into the lives of her subjects via one-on -one interviews.  Here is that 16-minute video…which may be of no interest to anyone, but seeing as I stumbled on it during a research mission, I thought I’d pass it on. 
The first section covers some of my early life being guided by a bona fide gangster and his wife, (my mother) with the last half being more about working as a cop in Miami, more specifically, in Homicide. Some folks might find it of interest.
Here’s the video: 
Marshall Frank, 75, Talks About Becoming a Detective in Miami, FL – YouTube

A FRANK MOVIE REVIEW – "1917" – 10.0

“1917”  –  Rating:   10.0
     In a word:  Intense
 
Alex Heeney is a movie critic who writes for Seventh Row. In regards to “1917”, he opines: 
    1917 is breathtaking in every way. A chamber drama tucked inside an exquisitely rendered war epic, 1917 is more heart-stopping thriller than traditional war movie.
     Before writing this review, I accessed a number of other professional critics to see if there was a consensus, because I had agreed totally with Mr. Heeney. The great majority of critics I found shared similar feelings about this picture.
     I think this will go down as one of the top ten war movies of all time, on a level with “Saving Private Ryan,” “Midway” and “Schindler’s List.”
     The basic premise of the story is as simple as it is complicated. During the final stages of WWI when Great Britain was in a critical position in the French countryside fighting the Germans, Lance Corporal Blake and Lance Corporal Schofield, young soldiers each, are selected by the field commander to embark on a harrowing foot mission to deliver a critical message to another American brigade commander thought to be trenched in miles away. The dire message, which could only be delivered by hand, is a matter of life and death for the other brigade. Time was of the essence. Not only that, one of the assigned soldiers is aware that his brother on the other side is facing certain death if the message is not received in time.
     The cinematography is outstanding throughout. One scene after another, we found ourselves caught up in the intensity and the horrors of war, as these two brave soldiers dodged one obstacle after another. The sense of realism reminded me of “Private Ryan.” 
     Did the soldiers achieve their goals?  Watch the movie.
     Director Sam Mendes is rightfully in line for a Best Director Oscar, one of nine other categories in which this movie earned nominations, including best cinematography.  
     The boys who played starring roles – Dean-Charles Chapman and George MacKay — certainly had their fitness tested to the limits in scene after scene of grueling dangers and near-impossible obstacles, not to mention having to wade through a sea of dead bodies.
     Alex Heeney said it best. It is breathtaking indeed. A heart-stopping thriller. As war films go, this movie would be tough to top. And, there’s very little bad language and no sexual references. 
     I give it a rare 10.
1917 (2019) – IMDb