A FRANK MOVIE REVIEW: “Twelve Mighty Orphans” – 9.0

A FRANK MOVIE REVIEW:

 

 “TWELVE MIGHTY ORPHANS” –  9.0

 

In a word:  Heartwarming

 

This! … Is a good movie. If you appreciate great scripts based on true stories, good acting, and a plot that’s all about trials and tribulations, destitution and tenacious efforts toward nearly impossible odds, you’ll find it all in this film.

     The story is based in an orphanage for children in Fort Worth ,Texas, circa 1938 where rough and tumble kids were rejected by troubled parents, or had no parents at all, making up the student body. Hostile attitudes and depression prevails amid all the boys and girls, while the crusty, and sometimes brutal, management by the institution leaves much to be desired.

     Recruited from a school/orphanage in another region, a teacher and football coach named Rusty Russell, (played by Luke Wilson) gives up a privileged position elsewhere to teach and coach a rag-tag, undisciplined football team that couldn’t score against any team, yet win. While seemingly unable to keep up with the standards of traditional schools, and against all odds without necessary resources, Mr. Russell instills a new sense of optimism in his young players who ultimately bond into shape as a competitive team. Their plight became a national story and inspiration to others among the downtrodden.

     Acting is a bit corny in spots, but who cares, it was a true series of events brought together by real people about unexpected accomplishments sparked by renewed attitudes of students and teacher that brought them together, becoming desperately needed families for the boys in order to overcome the odds.

     When the film is over, I urge people to remain in their seats to see the rolling credits that subsequently reveal the actual players/students from that era and their remarkable lifetime achievements that followed.  None of that could have happened if it were not for the persistence, courage and dedication inspired into those kids by a coach who convinced each one of them they had value and to never give up. The common denominator between the orphans and the coach can be summed up in one word: Love.

     Yes, I dropped a couple of tears. They were well-earned.

     Also starring in the film, was Martin Sheen, playing the school doctor who supported the new football coach, to the chagrin of the upper staff of the institution. In a brief scene, we can find aging actor Robert Duvall amid the crowd, but with no speaking role or discernable character. The appearance of his name and persona in the credits, I assume, was intended to draw folks to the theater.

I would give this movie a 9 out of 10.

 

12 Mighty Orphans (2021) – IMDb